Abandoned Berlin – Kaserne Krampnitz – Former Nazi / Russian Military Base – PT I

The abandoned Krampnitz

The abandoned Krampnitz

Visiting Berlin and living here is different, SF finds much more time to go to those hard to find outposts. It was worth it too. In the first of a series of Abandoned Berlin trips we visit somewhere with a thoroughly dark history.

Important to read this sign

Important to read this sign

Berlin is a City that constantly reveals new things, some that you will not find on the usual tourist guides or through the rather staid guides from Vice et al. There are numerous abandoned places to investigate, for those of an inquisitive mind and up for a little bit of a challenge.

Krampnitz - Nazi / Russian Military town

Krampnitz – Nazi / Russian Military town

Krampnitz - Nazi / Russian Military town

Krampnitz – Nazi / Russian Military town

Krampnitz is a former military base on the outskirts of Berlin, far enough from the usual tourist traps to be pretty quiet and perfect for those up for a bit of a letch out of Berlin.

Krampnitz - Accomodation

Krampnitz – Accommodation

From the get go this place is creepy, the history alone dictates it is going to have a certain dark feel to it. Krampnitz was a Nazi military base for training troops right up until the end of WWII. Used to house soldiers, dignitaries and the like, there are some 50 buildings including a sprawling gym, a theatre or three, grandiose halls and meeting rooms and much more besides.

Krampnitz - Keeping the troops fit

Krampnitz – Keeping the troops fit

And shooting people

And shooting people

One of 3 theatres we found

One of 3 theatres we found

And another

And another

Krampnitz - No idea what this was or should be

Krampnitz – No idea what this was or should be

Krampnitz - remaining furniture

Krampnitz – remaining furniture

And a car baby seat of course

And a car baby seat of course

Once the Germans had moved on the Russians quickly moved in, they gave it a lick of paint here and there and put up their own iconography but largely the place remained the same.

Krampnitz - Russian takeover

Krampnitz – Russian takeover

Ready to invade?

Ready to invade?

In the early 90’s these Russians headed off and the area was basically closed down, not something to evoke feelings of pride or achievement, it was boarded up, blocked off and made out of bounds to the general public. And if you tell the people not to go in then clearly they will head their at the soonest opportunity.

Leaving the Russian mark

Leaving the Russian mark

Russian newspapers from the 80's

Russian newspapers from the 80’s

There is one gem that SF did not manage to find on this visit, there is a huge mosaic of an Eagle, one of the icons of the Nazi era, it is in one of the great halls and one of the few pieces still remaining, it is however a bitch to find it and nobody online will reveal if they know for fear it will be vandalised or stolen.

Krampnitz - The imposing main building, bricked and boarded up completely

Krampnitz – The imposing main building, bricked and boarded up completely

The place now has been ransacked of any of the original furniture, artifacts and in some cases walls, but you still get a feeling for the place and it’s history.

As mentioned, getting there is a little tricky…. Basically you need to get to Postdam Hauptbahnhof, it is the end of the line. Then you come out of the main entrance, cross the road and head up the hill on the opposite side to the big redbrick council like buildings and get a 639 or 638 bus. Use this map to help navigate and get a google earth one to see the buildings

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2 thoughts on “Abandoned Berlin – Kaserne Krampnitz – Former Nazi / Russian Military Base – PT I

  1. Pingback: Abandoned Berlin – Kaserne Krampnitz – Former Nazi / Russian Military Base – PT II – Das Graffiti | standardfact

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